Overview

Fruit_Canned_USDA

This industry includes establishments primarily engaged in canning fruits, vegetables, and fruit and vegetable juices; and in manufacturing ketchup and similar tomato sauces, or natural and imitation preserves, jams, and jellies. Establishments primarily engaged in canning seafood are classified inNAICS 311711: Canned and Cured Fish and Seafoods; and those manufacturing canned specialties, such as baby foods and soups, except seafood, are classified in NAICS 311422: Canned Specialties.

 

The canned foods industry generated more than $14.5 billion in sales in the late 1990s. The total value of shipments grew from $15.8 billion in 1997 to $17.7 billion in 2000. Canned food processors were the primary market for many of the nation’s farmers. By contracting and paying in advance for a large part of the harvest, the industry guaranteed farmers and growers a cash income, helping to absorb the risks of marketing produce on the fresh market.

 

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, tomatoes, sweet corn, snap beans, and green peas were the four most-processed vegetables in the industry. Domestic demand for processed tomato products grew throughout the 1990s, while consumption of canned green peas declined. Production costs of canned goods consisted of payments to farmers, container and label costs, labor, and fuel for transportation. Insurance, rental payments, and machinery costs also contributed to production costs.

 

More Information at www.answers.com/topic/canned-fruits-vegetables-preserves-jams-and-jellies

 

Major Processes

Flow Canned Fruit

 

Apples_Harvest_USDA
Major Equipment

Natural Gas Technologies

Boilers

Can Cleaning

Cooking

Pasteurization

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Apples photo from http://www.usda.gov/oc/photo/95c0686.jpg 4/2007; Canned pears photo from http://www.usda.gov/oc/photo/02c0584.jpg 4/2007; Overview text from http://www.answers.com/topic/canned-fruits-vegetables-preserves-jams-and-jellies 5/2007;